October 12, 2013

light, sunny, sweet, and refreshing gluten-free day

Sefton Park, Liverpool, UK

I've heard there was some snow in Colorado last week. If you told me this a few days ago, I would have probably said, isn't that crazy? Especially when drawing the curtain, taking a short look outside and seeing that marvelously sunny October sky glittering with all its beauty.

Oh yes, not that very long ago we were still getting a relatively good weather in here. A bagful of nice warming rays of sun. A few rather summer-y showers. A gentle breeze, little by little painting the nature in colors, just like a lazy painter procrastinating that single brushstroke he has to make to finish up the picture.

Sefton Park, Liverpool, UK

It was already the beginning of October, but I could still treat myself with a generous scoop of ice cream while doing my Saturday shopping in a city center. Or, if the midday was favorable enough, I could even get involved into an affair with my book in the park.

Sefton Park, Liverpool, UK

Oh parks! Lovely English parks! (and gardens!) These are the things that astonish me probably the most in this country. One more beautiful than the other. More luxuriant. More glamorous. More extravagant and flourishing. The endless pathways, always a pond (or two), a few fountains, fishing lakes, perfectly cut law, and the uncountable number of play areas...

When was the last time you spent a quiet moment just doing nothing - just sitting and looking at the sea, or watching the wind blowing the tree limbs, or waves rippling on a pond, a flickering candle or children playing in the park? 
Ralph Marston 

Sefton Park, Liverpool, UK

I took these picture in Sefton Park a few weeks ago, before visiting the Farmer's Market in Lark Lane. When the morning was still breathing its last breaths, and the day was about to be born out of the magical mist, bringing along the promise of a truly marvelous day.

Sefton Park, Liverpool, UK

The air was crispy and so overwhelmingly fresh that my lungs, more used to deal with the grubby city air than with a fresh morning purity, were feeling a little bit strange.

Sefton Park, Liverpool, UK

And once decided to spent the afternoon in the park, there comes a need for something that could appease the whimsical tummy when it starts getting anxious. Granola bars, wholemeal chocolate chip or nut and seed enriched oatmeal cookies might do the job as usual, but since we are talking about a day enhanced with the beauty of natural colors and fresh air, we might as well be eager to taste that kind of experience. I don't know how about you, but a few gluten-free  lemon, honey, and poppy seed cookies are exactly what's needed. Light, sunny, delicately sweet, and nicely refreshing - just like that day itself.

Gluten-free Lemon, Honey & Poppy Seed Cookies

Lemon, Honey and Poppy Seed Cookies

150 g (5.3 oz) butter, softened
50 g (1.8 oz) light brown sugar
150 g (5.3 oz) honey
2 Tbsp poppy seeds
2 Tbsp grated lemon zest
4-5 Tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
100 g (3.5 oz) corn starch
200 g (7 oz) rice flour


Preheat the oven to 180 C (350 F) temperature. Line your baking sheet with parchment paper.
In a large bowl, cream together the butter and sugar. Add the honey and mix well. Stir in poppy seeds, lemons zest and lemon juice.
Sift the flour and the starch into the butter mixture and mix until the dough comes together. The dough should be very soft and slightly sticky.
To make the job easier, wet your hands, and then form small, approximately 2.5 cm (1 inch) diameter balls. Place them on the prepared baking sheet pressing each cookie with a fork. Transfer the tray to the oven and bake the cookies for about 20-25 minutes, or until nicely golden brown.
When cookies are done, cool on the wire rack. Once cooled, keep in an air-tight container.


Gluten-free Lemon, Honey & Poppy Seed Cookies

More gluten-free sweet snacks:
- Coconut Macaroons with Honey and Lemon-Balm
- Peanut Butter Banana Granola Bars
- Raspberry Coconut Macaroons

2 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. I used white rice flour, but you can use brown as well. Or better - half and half. Just if using only brown rice flour, I would suggest to start not with 200 g, but with ~170g, and add more as you go until you get the right texture of the dough :)

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